those doggone days of summer

Posted : June 2, 2003
Last Updated : May 30, 2013
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those doggone days of summer

During the summer, you can actually take a break from school (if you're not taking summer classes) and enjoy your free time. You don't have to worry about studying for tests, writing papers, or giving oral presentations. You don't have to get up early for class or spend your days in the library doing research. You don't have any college club meetings to attend or advising appointments to remember. You don't have to meet your psychology study group or tutor freshmen on math skills. But since you don't have to do any of these activities listed, what should you be doing during summer break?

Although you should definitely spend your summer break enjoying the weather, hanging out with your friends, and taking a vacation, you may also want to squeeze in a little time for career preparation. Don't worry; we're not asking you to do anything too hard. After all, you do deserve a break. But if you take time to do some of the following activities for career preparation over your summer break, you will thank yourself once graduation time comes.

  • Update your resume. Did you join any new clubs this past year? Get a new job? Update your resume with these new activities while you have the extra time. When you graduate from college and start looking for a job, you'll be glad that your resume is current.
  • Decide on a career path. If you still haven't figured out in which area you want to earn a degree, now is the time to find out. Utilize the Kuder Career Planning System to find out which careers will align with your skills and interests.
  • Research job opportunities. Use your extra time in the summer to research job opportunities. If you find a company/job that interests you, call and let them know that you are still a student but would be interested in interning or even volunteering at the company. This will help get your foot in the door once you graduate.
  • Practice answering interview questions. Check out these sample questions for a job interview and search the web for more questions that interviewers frequently ask. Then grab a friend or a family member and ask them to interview you. The more you practice interviewing for a job, the less nervous and more confident you will be when the time finally comes for the interview.
  • Volunteer. Find a volunteer activity that you would enjoy. Are you majoring in education? Volunteer at a day care center. Are you pre-med? Volunteer at your local hospital. Do you love science and biology? Volunteer at the zoo. There are a multitude of volunteer activities available to you. Not only will you be helping out your community, but you will also be doing something that can be added to your resume.
  • Read a variety of books. Interviewers love to ask questions about books that you have read recently. Don't be unprepared. Read a variety of books while you have the extra time. Not only will reading expand your mind and help you learn new vocabulary, but it can even help you land your dream job.

So you thought summer break was going to be filled with swimming pools, cookouts, and parties. Well, it still can be. You deserve to enjoy your summer break and have fun; just don't forget to take a little time to focus on your future with career preparation. You'll be happy that you did.


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those doggone days of summer






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